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The Sport Elephant Polo


The World Elephant Polo Association Established the governing rules for Elephant Polo in 1982 the association has its headquarters at the Tiger Tops Jungle Lodge in the Royal Chitwan Park in Nepal, which is where the World Elephant Polo Tournament played every year on a grassy airfield in Megauly. This tournament is played within a small circuit of Nepal and Thailand.
Elephant Polo originated in Meghauli, Nepal. Tiger Tops in Nepal remains the headquarters of elephant polo and the site of the World Elephant Polo Championships.
Elephant Polo is a Variant of Polo Played while riding elephants. It is played in Nepal, Sri Lanka, Rajasthan (India), and Thailand. England and Scotland regularly field teams. Equipment consists of a standard polo ball and six to ten foot cane (similar to bamboo) sticks with A Polo Mallet head on the end. The pitch is three-quarters of the length of a standard polo pitch, due to the lower speed of the elephants. Two people ride each elephant; the elephants are steered by mahouts, while the player tells the mahout which way to go and hits the ball.
Allegations of cruel treatment of polo elephants, made by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, have led to match cancellation, sponsorship withdrawal and the removal of references to elephant polo records in the Guinness Book of World Records.
The equipment of Elephant polo includes a standard polo ball and a 6 to ten foot cane stick with a polo mallet at the end. Originally a soccer ball was used, but now that has been replaced by a standard polo ball.
The pitch used is around three quarters of the length of a typical polo pitch. It’s this way because of the slower speed of the Elephants.
elephant polo has been registered as an Olympic sport in Nepal and is internationally recognised as an official sport, which is also played in India, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The World Elephant Polo Association acts as an umbrella organisation for the championship in Nepal,




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